Amazon.com lists over 8,000 items under the search term "fertility"
Image: Twice-married Adrienne Barbeau is a mother of three children

March 1997 -- Adrienne Barbeau is mostly known for playing in the horror movies and her role as Carol on the 1972 sitcom TV show Maude, alongside Beatrice Arthur.

She was 51 years old when she gave birth to identical twin boys - making her the only woman on the maternity ward who was a member of AARP.

She lives in Los Angeles with her husband, well-known Broadway and TV director, Billy Van Zandt, with the twins, and her older son, Cody.

Within a year of knowing each other, Adrienne and Billy exchanged their wedding vows on December 31, 1992.

They both wanted children so they started trying to conceive as soon as they were married.

Adrienne was blessed with twin sons Walker Steven and William Dalton Van Zandt who were born on March 17, 1997.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: 50 Things You Can Do Today to Increase Your Fertility, by Sally Lewis and Nim Barnes. Publisher: Summersdale (October 1, 2011)50 Things You Can Do Today to Increase Your Fertility
by Sally Lewis and Nim Barnes

-- Practical advice and a holistic approach to help you conceive, including simple dietary and lifestyle changes and do it yourself complementary therapies.

In this accessible and informative guide, Sally Lewis explains how age, sexual infections, diet, excess weight, stress, and anxiety affect fertility.

Teaching how to discover the best time for conception; understand the link between body, mind, and fertility; and manage stress and relax to prevent anxiety, this is the ultimate guide to increasing the likelihood of conception at any age.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 128 pages
Click to order/for more info: 50 Things You Can Do Today to Increase Your Fertility

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading 50 Things You Can Do Today to Increase Your Fertility on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.
Image: 31 weeks pregnant, by Liz Davenport, on Flickr

I will be 45 years old in March.

I am eight weeks pregnant with my first child, and I feel so blessed and happy.

I have not had any morning sickness... so far.

Just some random nausea here and there.

I am so tired all the time, I'd sleep anytime if I had the chance.

But I wouldn't change them for the world, knowing my little jewel is growing each day inside of me.

Exciting isn't it!?

- KimSue


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: The Baby Business: How Money, Science, and Politics Drive the Commerce of Conception, by Debora L. Spar. Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press; 1 edition (February 14, 2006)The Baby Business: How Money, Science, and Politics Drive the Commerce of Conception
by Debora L. Spar

-- Despite legislation claiming to prohibit it, there is a thriving market for babies spreading across the globe.

Fueled by rapid advances in reproductive medicine and the desperate desires of millions of would-be parents, the acquisition of children — whether through donated eggs, rented wombs, or cross-border adoption — has become a multi-billion dollar industry that has left science, law, ethics, and commerce deeply at odds.

In The Baby Business, Debora Spar argues it is time to acknowledge the commercial truth about reproduction and to establish a standard governing its transactions.

In this fascinating behind-the-scenes account, she combines pioneering research and interviews with the industry's top reproductive scientists and trailblazers to provide a first glimpse at how the industry works: who the baby-makers are, who makes money, how prices are set, and what defines the clientele.

Fascinating stories illustrate the inner workings of market segments -- including stem cell research, surrogacy, egg swapping, designer babies, adoption, and human cloning -- as Spar explores the moral and legal challenges that industry players must address.

The first purely commercial look at an industry dealing in humanity's most intimate issues, this book challenges us to consider the financial promise and ethical perils we'll face as the baby business moves inevitably forward.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comHardcover: 302 pages
Click to order/for more info: The Baby Business
Image: Hang Loose/Sleeping Baby. Photo credit: Ricardo Marques on FreeImages
Elizabeth, 48 years old, 8 weeks pregnant:

As for my story, I have one son conceived using donor eggs, he is 3 years old.

My husband and I had tried naturally since I was about 40 years old, and had numerous chemical pregnancies, had my son in 2003 and conceived naturally in September 2004, lost that one at 7 weeks due to blighted ovum, then became pregnant again immediately and lost that pregnancy - it was a twin one, the one in the uterus miscarried and the other was ectopic out by my right ovary, fortunately, it died at 7 weeks and was reabsorbed.

Since then I had a brief chemical pregnancy in 2005 and nothing since.

My husband and I had moved on and accepted there would be no brother/sister for our son and just made love when we felt like it without taking any precautions, and this month was what I would tactfully call a very brief liaison about the time I was fertile, having a noisy and curious 3-year-old puts paid to long romantic evenings especially when he won't go to bed earlier than 9pm!

So it was a huge surprise to find myself getting pregnancy symptoms about 3 weeks ago, and even more so to see a proper line on an HPT [home pregnancy test], I had a positive on a Clearblue digital at what I guess was 10dpo (it was only about 22 days since my last period).

With my history of ectopic and blighted ovums, etc and our ages, it is hard to believe this pregnancy has a hope of producing a healthy baby one day but I am trying (not very successfully) to take things one day at a time.

At 48 years old, I have mixed feelings about being so old with a newborn.

I will still be 48, assuming all goes, when the baby is born.

But all my female relatives had babies well into their late 40's, so know it is possible and they lived well into their 80's and 90's and reared happy healthy children.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: The Long-Awaited Stork: A Guide to Parenting After Infertility, by Ellen Sarasohn Glazer. Publisher: Jossey-Bass; Revised Edition edition (March 13, 1998)The Long-Awaited Stork: A Guide to Parenting After Infertility
by Ellen Sarasohn Glazer

-- Parents who have wondered about the long term impact of infertility on their self-image will find the answers in this insightful book by Lois Melina, author of Raising Adopted Children and Making Sense of Adoption.

Finally, here's a book that's sensitive and responsive to the unique emotional experience of parenting after a long, arduous course of infertility diagnosis and treatment.

The Long-Awaited Stork gives you all the information, advice, and support you need to adjust to and cope with the special problems of parenting after infertility.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 368 pages
Click to order/for more info: The Long-Awaited Stork
Image: Gangsta Baby, by Caitlin Regan, on Flickr
My doctor has had success using the Estrogen Priming Protocol.

This protocol consists of an estrogen patch or Estrace tablets started about day 21 in the cycle before stimulation.

This has been very successful in bringing down FSH [follicle stimulating hormone] levels, which is a real benefit to women with borderline ovarian reserve.

This is similar to the protocol my friend Patti recently used to successfully get pregnant at 44 years old.

Yeah, Patti!!


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: IVF: A Patient's Guide, by Rebecca Matthews. Publisher: lulu.com (February 7, 2011)IVF: A Patient's Guide
by Rebecca Matthews

-- The perfect companion book for anyone considering or currently undergoing fertility treatment. Reduce your stress and improve your chance of success by arming yourself with the facts.

Written by a respected, caring and practicing expert in the field, not a patient!

Inside these pages, you'll get answers to the most common questions, but even better, get answers to the critical questions that aren't asked often enough; some could even save the life of your baby.

Understand the most up-to-date, cutting edge techniques utilized in IVF and genetic testing.

See exactly what happens under the microscope. Learn how to choose the very best clinic and what, exactly, you should be asking your doctor. Follow specific case studies and hear from a variety of patients in their own words as well.

Packed with charts, tables, graphs and photos, this easy to navigate guide is the next best thing to having a best friend in the field of reproductive medicine.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 174 pages
Click to order/for more info: IVF: A Patient's Guide

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading IVF: A Patient's Guide on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.
Image: Happy Days, by Crissy Pauley on FreeImages

I can't relate to being an over 50 years old mom, but I'm the daughter of an over 50 mom.

I'm child number seven, arriving when my mom was 55 years old, and her second menopause baby!

Most of our nieces and nephews were older than us, except two were born within eight months of me!

My sisters said what was weird was being pregnant when Mom was, and she didn't go crazy over the grand-kids as much as their in-laws did.

I was so lucky to have my mom for 40 years after my birth.

My older kids loved her sooo much.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: 50 Things You Can Do Today to Increase Your Fertility, by Sally Lewis and Nim Barnes. Publisher: Summersdale (October 1, 2011)50 Things You Can Do Today to Increase Your Fertility
by Sally Lewis and Nim Barnes

-- Practical advice and a holistic approach to help you conceive, including simple dietary and lifestyle changes and do it yourself complementary therapies.

In this accessible and informative guide, Sally Lewis explains how age, sexual infections, diet, excess weight, stress, and anxiety affect fertility.

Teaching how to discover the best time for conception; understand the link between body, mind, and fertility; and manage stress and relax to prevent anxiety, this is the ultimate guide to increasing the likelihood of conception at any age.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 128 pages
Click to order/for more info: 50 Things You Can Do Today to Increase Your Fertility

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading 50 Things You Can Do Today to Increase Your Fertility on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.
Image: In grandma Julia's arms - 13 days old, by Jessica Merz, on Flickr

I had my last child when I was 46 years old.

I have certainly heard of many other women on this board who have delivered healthy babies when they were over 45 years old.

I think the oldest mom-to-be on this discussion board was 49 years old when she gave birth to a healthy baby boy.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Stay Fertile Longer: Everything You Need to Know to Get Pregnant Now--Or Whenever You're Ready, by Mary Kittel and Deborah Metzger. Publisher: Rodale Books (August 26, 2004)Stay Fertile Longer: Everything You Need to Know to Get Pregnant Now--Or Whenever You're Ready
by Mary Kittel and Deborah Metzger

-- Many women today dream of having it all -- a challenging career, a satisfying personal life, a loving mate, and a baby whenever they are ready.

But there's no denying the fact their biological clocks are ticking away.

The odds of conceiving drop by 15 to 20 percent for a woman in her early 30s, and plummet to less than 50 percent when she is in her 40s.

The good news is there are a host of natural strategies every would-be mom can use today to preserve and optimize her fertility so she can conceive quickly and easily when she's ready.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 352 pages
Click to order/for more info: Stay Fertile Longer
Image: Happy mom with twins, by Joelle Inge-Messerschmidt, www.photographybyjoelle.com, on Flickr

My doctor also said as we get closer to menopause, our ovaries can shoot eggs out at random with no warning, as last-ditch efforts.

She has worked with women who thought they didn't ovulate, but out of the blue, got pregnant.

Their charts showed no ovulation. I didn't know this was possible.

She is about 50+ years old, by her looks, and has a set of six-year-old twins.

She said when she conceived, she ovulated the day before her period.

She had her period and found out she was pregnant shortly after that.

I don't know how she knew she ovulated that day, but I believe her.

She also said a really hot night of sex is all it takes for some women to pop that egg out.

Maybe that's why some women get pregnant after giving up the job of TTC [trying to conceive].

They go back to BD'ing [baby-dancing] for the enjoyment, which I haven't done in so long.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Infertility: Help, Hope, and Healing, by Kerstin Daynes. Publisher: Cedar Fort Inc (February 8, 2010)Infertility: Help, Hope, and Healing
by Kerstin Daynes

-- After five years of tests, Kerstin Daynes had her worst fear confirmed: she was infertile.

In this honest and reassuring handbook, Kerstin shares her own personal experiences facing infertility and offers insights that will help couples to heal emotionally, physically, spiritually, mentally, and socially.

Using timeless concepts and introducing unique perspectives, Kerstin gently and empathetically walks the reader through this life-changing process as she shows couples how to make their lives productive while facing their situation.

Infertility: Help, Hope, and Healing gives couples a quick reference that can be used repeatedly as they experience the ups and downs of grieving.

Even with physical infertility, life can still be fertile, fruitful, and filled with hope.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 192 pages
Click to order/for more info: Infertility: Help, Hope, and Healing
Image: Baby on the Beach, by Jürgen Jester on Pixabay

Many women aged over 45 years can have symptoms of menopause (like hot flashes) whilst still having regular periods.

Similarly, a woman may be having only 2-3 periods per year and yet still be ovulating, which means technically she can still become pregnant.

Abstract: Fertility in women after age forty-five.

There were 10 patients who menstruated to age 55 with an occasional missed period, 63 patients menstruated regularly to age 50, and the remainder had irregular menses before complete cessation of menstruation. None of these patients after age 49 years used contraception or hormone replacement therapy. There were 82 pregnancies that occurred in women 45 years of age and older. The oldest in this group delivered 6 days after her 49th birthday and 1 week beyond her expected date of confinement. This was her 10th pregnancy.


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: Unsung Lullabies: Understanding and Coping with Infertility, by Martha Diamond, David Diamond and Janet Jaffe. Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; 1st edition (June 1, 2005)Unsung Lullabies: Understanding and Coping with Infertility
by Martha Diamond, David Diamond and Janet Jaffe

-- For people experiencing infertility, wanting a baby is a craving unlike any other. The intensity of their longing is matched only by the complexity of the emotional maze they must navigate.

With insight and compassion, Drs. Janet Jaffe, Martha Diamond, and David Diamond-specialists in the field of Reproductive Psychology who have each experienced their own struggle with infertility-give couples the tools to:

 • Reduce their sense of helplessness and isolation
 • Identify their mates' coping styles to erase unfair expectations
 • Listen to their unsung lullabies--their conscious and unconscious dreams about having a family -- to mourn the losses of infertility and move on.

Ground-breaking, wise, and compassionate, Unsung Lullabies is a necessary companion for anyone coping with infertility.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 304 pages
Click to order/for more info: Unsung Lullabies

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comStart reading Unsung Lullabies on your Kindle in under a minute!

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.
Image: Isabella, by Bev Sykes on Flickr
Photo credit: Isabella,by Bev Sykes
My sister in law from Toronto, Canada had her first baby at 45 years old - she had a beautiful baby girl!

She said her OB/GYN was so supportive.

I have to remember... my grandma gave birth to my uncle in her 40s.

My mom also gave birth to my little brother in her 40s...

I'm gonna follow the pattern!


TODAY'S BOOK SUGGESTION:
Image: When You're Not Expecting: An Infertility Survival Guide, by Constance Hoenk Shapiro. Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (February 16, 2010)When You're Not Expecting: An Infertility Survival Guide
by Constance Hoenk Shapiro

-- Surviving the challenges of infertility

Often enduring years of heartache, couples with infertility number over 7.3 million. Enduring the daunting difficulties of treatment is something few women are prepared for.

Based on the personal stories of 200 women determined to overcome infertility, this surprisingly upbeat survivors' guide gives the kind of hard-won wisdom essential to making it through the process.

Not only does the book detail coping strategies, it also presents tips for strengthening stressed relationships and addresses the unique needs of single women and lesbians.

An essential guide for women and couples, friends and family, and health care providers and therapists, this book offers the solace and strength needed to prevail even after years of struggle.

Written by a therapist, consultant, and public speaker dedicated to the study of infertility and its emotional impact.

For any woman or couple who feel as if they're facing infertility alone, When You're Not Expecting is a must-have book.

Image: Buy Now on Amazon.comPaperback: 272 pages
Click to order/for more info: When You're Not Expecting
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